Copped It @ A Twist of Noir

My little tale of a heist gone wrong is over at the brand-spanking-new A Twist of Noir. We’re all glad to see ATON back sharing stories — and surprise, I’m following on the heels of Mr B, who’s got a fine little black diamond, ‘Things I Used to Like’ (and he gets to be #007, too). You won’t be surprised to find ‘Copped It’ is another title stolen from The Fall. I can’t help being inspired: originality is overrated anyway 😉 besides, you might catch a few other references in the tale.

Thanks, Chris!

Slovenian Double Feature

Two stories just out this month, both inspired by my travels in Slovenia. ‘These Toys Are For Tough Boys’ was the title Renato Bratkovič gave me as I was treated with great food, Lasko Noir and Alibi wine at Bar Grega and Gora pod lipo. Want a story from me? Fly me to an alpine location and give me good stuff to eat and drink. Boom! 6K story in a day.

Any takers?
‘Somewhere in Slovenia’ over at Near to the Knuckle looks at the potential problems of being unilingual in post-Brexit EU. Footie fans beware 😉 heh. Also a song by Slovenia’s premiere punk band, Res Nullius.

Interview: Paul D. Brazill

too-many-crooksHey, it’s the Duke of Brit Grit, that Paul D. Brazill! So what’s this new book of yours out this weekend?

Too Many Crooks is my latest Brit Grit novella and is published by Near To The Knuckle. It’s set in England and Poland. It’s a mix of pulp, farce and the grotesque. No change there, then. Though there is a bit of romance in this one …

The blurb says:

Too Many Crooks is a blackly comic Brit Grit romp from the author of Guns Of Brixton and Kill Me Quick!

When high-class fence Leslie Hawkins meets Peter Rhatigan in a sleazy London pub, he offers her the chance to get her hands on the Totenkopfring, a legendary piece of World War Two memorabilia. However, after a violent encounter with a member of a biker gang, things soon spiral wildly and dangerously out of control. Meanwhile in Poland, Dr Anna Nowak finds an amnesiac Englishman half-dead in the snow…

Too Many Crooks by Paul D, Brazill is a fast-moving and action-packed cocktail of bodies, bullets and death-black comedy.

How many crooks is too many? Is there a scientific basis for this claim?

Well there is a veritable cornucopia of crooks in Too Many Crooks. There are gangsters, a jewel thief, a biker gang, a mental neo-nazi politician. In fact there are pretty much only crooks! How they all collide is part of the fun, of course.

Are there more pop song references in this book or comedy classics?

Well the shadows of the Carry On films and Ealing Comedies hang heavy over the book, as per usual, and there are lots of top tunes from the likes of Black Sabbath, Alice Cooper, and The Flys.

Should readers begin at the beginning and read all the way through or can they jump about from tale to tale?

Well, it’s a novella, so there’s only one story so it’s best to start at the beginning or it may not make sense. It may not anyway, of course!

Are there really large American themed bars in Warsaw? What on earth for?

There are indeed though not as many as there are overpriced Irish pubs. A Polish pub was once spotted …

What’s next from your prolific pen?

My novella A Case Of Noir will be re-published by Near To The Knuckle in March and there should be another novella out a bit after that. And I have a story in the debut issue of Switchblade Magazine.

Pre-order TOO MANY CROOKS! here.

Paul D. Brazill‘s books include The Last Laugh, Guns Of Brixton, Too Many Crooks, and Kill Me Quick! He was born in England and lives in Poland. His writing has been translated into Italian, German and Slovene. He has had writing published in various magazines and anthologies, including The Mammoth Books of Best British Crime. His blog is here.

Out Now: You Left Your Biscuit Behind

OUT NOW!

As Aunty Fox says:

Our first crime themed anthology featuring crime, fantasy, horror, humour and baked goods. It’s basically just like one of our events.

10 stories, by ten authors, all with a crime at their heart, some of them with biscuits. Whether that is the stories or the authors I leave to you.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000448_00024]

Contents
Elf Prefix by Graham Wynd
Between Love and Hat by Jay Eales
Ghost Signals by James Bennett
No Mercy by K.D. Kinchen
That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles by Penny Jones
Feeding the Fish by Carol Borden
Mermaids in Cape Town by Mame Diene
Patron by E.J. Davies
The Price of a Biscuit by Kate Coe
The Princess, The Pekingese and the Ivory Box by R.A. Kennedy

Buy You Left Your Biscuit Behind / Amazon.com

Crime Fiction: The Creative/Critical Nexus

If you’re interested in crime writing at all, check out this issue of TEXT magazine: Crime Fiction: The Creative/Critical Nexus, edited by Rachel Franks, Jesper Gulddal and Alistair Rolls. I am very happy to have my close analysis of Dorothy B. Hughes’ The Expendable Man [PDF download].

lawsons_pen2

TEXT

Special Issues Series
Number 37 October 2016

Crime Fiction: The Creative/Critical Nexus
Edited by Rachel Franks, Jesper Gulddal and Alistair Rolls

Rachel Franks, Jesper Guldall and Alistair Rolls
Editorial

Carolyn Beasley
Writing a murderous mother: a case study on the critical applications of creative writing research to crime fiction

Rachel Franks
Learning all the tricks: critiquing crime fiction in a creative writing PhD

Jason Bainbridge
Lawyer as critic: analysing the legal thriller through the works of Grisham, Gardner and Lee

Donna Lee Brien and Rachel Franks
Trial by jury and newspaper reportage: re-writing women’s stories from legal transcripts and contemporaneous journalism

Alistair Rolls
Creative, critical, intertextual: Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

Heath A Diehl
‘There are times when an old rule should be abandoned, or a current rule should not be applied’: narration, innovation and hardboiled fiction in Sue Grafton’s “T” is for Trespass

Matthew McGuire
Narratives of apprehension: crime fiction and the aftermath of the Northern Irish Troubles

Jean Anderson
Something old, something new, something borrowed: imitation, limitation and inspiration in French crime fiction

Jamie Popowich
The endangered species list: the mercurial writing of Charles Willeford and the strange case of The Shark-Infested Custard

KA Laity
Subtle hues: character and race in Dorothy B. Hughes’ The Expendable Man

Leigh Redhead
There was nothing, there was nowhere to go: writing Australian rural noir

Jesper Gulddal and Alistair Rolls
Detective fiction and the critical-creative nexus

Out Now: The Damp Fedora by Kate Pilarcik

From the same folks who brought you the Anthony Award-winning anthology Murder Under the Oaks, Down & Out Books slings a slang-rich novella from Absolutely*Kate Pilarcik that has tongues wagging around noir shadows. What’s the hubbub, bub?

THE DAMP FEDORA introduces 1940’s detective Nelle Callahan, gal gumshoe with gumption, with a case that struts its stuff like the breeze off a good Narragansett sail. Brisk. Brash. Knowing where the wind’s coming from, and yet … wondering. Nelle’s job? Cut through some slick con’s shadow, lift a corner of chintz off the mist, let some truth shine in for the chippies and the chopper squad — you know — menfolk who measure themselves by how big their tommy guns really are.

I’m diving into it right now and I can say there’s nothing out there quite like it. Fans of the genre will get a kick out of the style as Nelle sashays around the town. Check out the deets here and tell ’em I sent you.

Out Now: Close to the Boneyard

From the wild guys at Near to the Knuckle, Close to the Bone comes a compendium of tales featured on the site in 2012. A great idea! Thanks, Craig Douglas. Includes my tale ‘Just Waiting’ but look at the full line up:

Erik Arneson – Swing and A Miss
Stuart Ayris – Heads or Tails
Bill Baber – Turn Me Loose
David Barber – Monster
Jack Bates – Sleep Tight
Eric Beetner – Gutshot
Paul D Brazill – Killing Mr Cornflakes
Joe Clifford – The Banyan Tree
Cheryl Anne Gardner – Victoria’s Even Bigger Secret
Candy Green Gustavson – California Dying
Ruth Jacobs – Protection
Dana C Kabel – Drinkin’ on the Job
Rob Kitchin – Target Practice
Len Kuntz – The Haters Club
Chris Leek – Reno
Benoit Lelievre – The Devil’s Shinbone
Finley J MacDonald – Blood Magic
Tom Pitts – Vigil
Ryan Sales – Douche
Andy Scorah – Shaka’s Fall
Graham Smith – The Morning After
Gareth Spark – Rundown Dog
BR Stateham – Vengeance is a Cruel Mistress
Liam Sweeney – All I Need is a Day
Aidan Thorn – The Clean Up
Edward Vaughan – Not in the Cards
Charlie Wade – Friday Night Fun
Townsend Walker – Cold Beer
Eileen Wharton – The Hollow Man
Graham Wynd – Just Waiting

Click to Buy

And yes, another swiped title from The Fall:

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