Mabuse MAD!

220px-testamentofdrmabuse-posterI blame Carol at the Cultural Gutter for kicking me off onto this tangent. To my film shame, I had not ever sat down to watch the entirety of Fritz Lang’s classic crime film, Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse. As an academic, I am of course always in search of ways to supplement my paltry pay so I joked about turning to hypnosis or tarot or even advertising, as well as crime.

‘Why not combine them all, Mabuse style?’

She was right as usual. Put all my esoteric and criminal arts to use as a mastermind behind capers of a nefarious nature: genius! Only in fiction, surely! First I needed to sit down and enjoy Lang’s masterpiece of expressionist cinema, collaborating with his talented wife Thea von Harbou, who adapted one of Norbert Jacques‘ unfinished novels on the shadowy figure (yes, I’ve got to read the novels, too).

There’s just so much good here, even if you’re not contemplating a life of crime. Secret hideouts, nefarious plans, dapper grifters, glass alligators — and a medical school (in 1933) more diverse than many top ones are now. Cool special effects, too. So here’s a bunch of images to give you a reason to watch the film, too. Helps if you have the Criterion Channel or Kanopy. Click the images to embiggen. I’m going to work on my hypnotic stare now.

Love is a Grift: Official Music Video

‘LOVE IS A GRIFT’: Now there’s a music video for the theme song!

GRAHAM WYND’s Love is a Grift out from Fox Spirit Books.

Words & Music © 2019 K. A. Laity (Nicnevin Music / ASCAP)

Victoria Squid – Vocals
Julie Beman – Piano
Eric Bloomquist – Bass
Rich Germain – Drums
Brian Slattery – Trombone
Produced and arranged by Julie Beman and Eric Bloomquist
Engineered and mixed by Eric Bloomquist at Cool Ranch Studio

Artwork by S. L. Johnson

Video remix from ‘Sing, Sinner, Sing!’ (1933) by K. A. Laity (via Internet Archive)

Film for a Friday: La Strega

Ida Lupino brings her genius to the helm of this Karloff-hosted Thriller episode. If you think early television was mostly toothless, watch what happens to Ursula Andress. Bonus: modern dance-inspired witches sabat!

Film for a Friday – Buzzcocks: In Their Own Words

Courtesy of the British Library from their Punk 1976-8 Exhibit ‘celebrating the 40th anniversary of this exciting musical phenomenon’: http://www.bl.uk/punk-exhibition.

Featured image from the Museum of Sex Punk Lust exhibit.

#Noirvember Song for a Saturday: Ida Lupino – One for My Baby

Yeah, it’s all Ida this week. Impressing on my students the genius that she was. They watched this clip as an introduction. We discussed what they assumed to be going on in the scene based on their knowledge of noir now. They did pretty well. If you haven’t seen the film, it can be found in its entirety on the ‘tube.

‘She does more without a voice than anybody I’ve ever heard!’

How’s your #Noirvember going? Got a favourite noir tune?

#Noirvember: The Hitch-Hiker

Kicking off the month with the film my students will be watching and discussing next week. Directed by the legend Ida Lupino.

Film for a Friday: Sin Takes a Holiday

I meant to get another book review done this week, but it’s been surprisingly hectic hereabouts. So here’s a little Zasu Pitts and Constance Bennett plus Basil Rathbone as a cad in Sin Takes a Holiday. Art Deco bonus points for design!

Here’s Zasu and Thelma Todd:

zasu-pitts-and-thelma-todd-laughing-in-bed

Film for a Friday: Office Killer

Cindy Sherman’s surreally effective film starring the amazing Carol Kane

On vimeo:

Film for a Friday: Elevator to the Gallows

There are a few holes in my film diary: an embarrassing one has now been remedied. Criterion has an absolutely mesmerising release of Louis Malle’s Elevator to the Gallows with the radiant Jeanne Moreau. I swear there’s not a frame that doesn’t sing. Of course there’s the fine soundtrack by Miles but you probably already knew that. If you haven’t seen it — or haven’t seen it lately — it’s about time, don’t you think?